Palmer School Scholars Celebrate National Library Week

Palmer School Scholars Celebrate National Library Week

 

Tom Kenny Lee Rainie Rita Langdon David Jank 2018 (002)
From left: LIU Post alumni Tom Kenny, Lee Rainie, Rita Langdon and David Jank

The Palmer School of Library and Information Science at Long Island University is one of the oldest library and i-schools in the country. In celebration of National Library Week–  April 8-14, 2018 — students, professors and alumni from the Palmer School are engaged in a number of activities.

Information Studies Doctoral Professor David Jank ’10 (PhD) and Ph.D. students Rita Langdon (’91, ’95 MA, ’17 MPhil) who is LIU Post’s dean of professional education and transfer and graduate enrollment, and Tom Kenny, (’17 MPhil), who is Molloy College’s instructor and director of media facilities, were panelists at The Broadcast Education Association (BEA) annual academic conference on April 8 in Las Vegas. Jank, Langdon and Kenny, who represent the LIU i-Team of Information Scientists, presented a panel on emerging technologies in social media and the digital college generation.

The BEA conference’ keynote speaker was Lee Rainie (H’09), director of internet and technology research at Pew Research Institute in Washington, D.C., and a graduate of LIU Post’s M.A. in Political Science program (’77). He earned a bachelor’s degree from Harvard, is the former managing editor of U.S. News and World Report, and author of several books, including “Networked: The new social operating system“.

Spearheading this year’s National Library Week, themed “Libraries Lead”, is Loida Garcia-Febo, a Ph.D. student in Information Studies at the LIU Palmer School and current president of the American Library Association.

Meanwhile nationally renowned archivist and LIU Professor Dr. Greg Hunter is managing a $1.5 million grant from the Robert David Lion Gardiner Foundation to launch the Digitizing Long Island History project. Dr. Hunter and his students are digitizing historical documents from more than 100 historical societies in Nassau and Suffolk counties. A new Gardiner Institute symposia will be presented in late June on the LIU Post campus in Brookville, N.Y.

Dr. Tom Walker, director of the Palmer School, just returned from iConference in Sheffield (UK), the annual conference about the information world and higher education sponsored by the iSchool consortium. The iSchools promote information-related research and advances in higher-education, including curriculum development, external funding opportunities, and collaborations.

To learn more about the Palmer School’s M.S. in Library and Information Science, and Ph.D. in Information Studies, attend an open house at LIU’s Manhattan location at NYU Bobst Library on April 17, 2018 or May 8, 2018 at 6 p.m. To reserve a spot at the open house, email Kathy.Riley@liu.edu or call 516-299-4010.

 

 

“Digitizing Local History Sources” Funded by the Robert David Lion Gardiner Foundation

Information for Students

A generous five-year grant from the Robert David Lion Gardiner Foundation is enabling the Palmer School to digitize materials in local historical societies, with an emphasis on Suffolk County.  The $1.5 million grant provides fellowships for master’s and doctoral students to assist with the project.

About the Project

“Digitizing Local History Sources” began on February 1, 2017 and will end on January 31, 2022. The goal of the project is to digitize materials in 80 local historical societies. At the start of the project, the Palmer School established an on-campus Digitization Laboratory featuring two scanners:

  • A “DT Atom Digitization System” manufactured by Digital Transitions
  • An Epson Expression 12000XL with transparency adapter

The Palmer School also created two mobile digitization units, each containing an Epson Perfection V800 scanner and a Dell laptop computer.  Students use these mobile units to digitize materials on-site at historical societies.

Scanned images are stored in Preservica Cloud Edition, a leading digital preservation system.  Each historical society retains ownership of and controls access to its materials stored in Preservica.

The Project Director is Dr. Gregory Hunter.  He may be reached at 516-299-2171 or ghunter@liu.edu

Gardiner Foundation Master’s Fellowship

To be eligible for a Gardiner Foundation Master’s Fellowship, a student must be matriculated in either the Master of Science in Library and Information Science (MSLIS) or the Certificate of Advanced Study in Archives and Records Management (CARM).

Gardiner Foundation Master’s Fellows receive six credits of tuition remission for each semester in which they are a fellow.  At this point in the project, there is a maximum of nine Master’s Fellows per semester.

First-time Master’s Fellows must enroll in LIS 693, “Gardiner Foundation Internship.”  LIS 693 is open to all Palmer School students at any point in the program.  Students may only register for LIS 693 once.  Students may apply for fellowships in additional semesters, subject to the availability of funds.

Master’s Fellows spend 120 hours during the semester assisting with the grant project.  Fellows must be able to spend two days per week on the project, each day consisting of five hours.  Some historical societies may be open on Saturday.

Master’s Fellows digitize historical images and create metadata for the images.  Most of the digitization takes place at the local historical societies; fellows must travel to the historical societies to conduct on-site project activities.  Fellows also use the digitization equipment in the on-campus laboratory.

Gardiner Foundation Doctoral Fellowship

To be eligible for the Gardiner Foundation Doctoral Fellowship, a student must be matriculated in the Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in Information Studies.

Gardiner Foundation Doctoral Fellows receive six credits of tuition remission for each semester in which they are a fellow.  There will be a maximum of two Doctoral Fellows per semester.  Students may apply for fellowships in additional semesters, subject to the availability of funds.  A student may receive a Doctoral Fellowship for a maximum of four semesters.

Doctoral Fellows spend 120 hours during the semester assisting with the grant project.  Doctoral Fellows perform quality assurance on scanned images and metadata, and enter items into Preservica.  Most project activities are conducted in the on-campus Palmer School Digitization Laboratory. 

Please see the application for the master’s level fellowship here:
Application for Master’s Fellowship

 Please see the application for the doctoral level fellowship here:
Application for Doctoral Fellowship

Completed applications should be returned to the Palmer School Scholarship Committee via email to Heather.ranieri@liu.edu.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

LIU Post Announces $1 Million Grant from Robert David Lion Gardiner Foundation to Expand Project to Preserve LI History

Grant Expands Partnership with LIU Post’s Acclaimed Palmer School

BROOKVILLE, N.Y. (December 4, 2017) –LIU Post’s Palmer School of Library and
Information Science was awarded a $1 million grant from the Robert David Lion Gardiner Foundation to expand an important project to both preserve Long Island’s history and make it more accessible.

The $1 million grant comes on the heels of an initial $500,000 grant from the Foundation in 2016 to launch the Digitizing Long Island History project. The project has received a far greater response than anticipated from historical societies, both in terms of the number of participants and volume of material. Under the initial grant, the Palmer School is partnering with 28 historical societies. The additional $1 million grant will expand the project to 80 historical societies over 4 years.

“We are proud to expand the successful partnership between the nationally-recognized Palmer School and the Robert David Lion Gardner Foundation to help protect our region’s rich history,” said LIU President Dr. Kimberly R. Cline. “This project to preserve vital historical documents and make them accessible will have a lasting impact on our region, now and for future generations.”

The following historical societies are taking part in the program this semester–
Freeport Historical Society Museum, Southold Historical Society, Historical Society of the Massapequas, Stirling Historical Society of Greenport, Sagtikos Manor Historical Society, Museum of the Village of Rockville Centre, and the Three Village Historical Society.

The Palmer School works with the historical societies to do some work on location, and other work at LIU Post. Fragile, oversized, and bound items are brought to the Palmer School’s Lab for scanning on a large, DT Atom tabletop digitization platform. The School also has two portable digitization units that students are able to take to the historical societies for the other material.

The Palmer School is a national leader in library science and one of just 62 schools accredited by the American Library Association. It offers the only Ph.D. program in Information Studies in the New York metropolitan area and is the only library sciences school in our region to be admitted into membership in the prestigious iSchools Consortium.

The project is led by Dr. Gregory Hunter, Professor of Library and Information Science, who heads the doctoral program at the Palmer School. Dr. Hunter is a nationally-recognized expert who was a key member of the team that designed and implemented the Electronic Records Archives for the National Archives and Records Administration. A Certified Archivist and a Certified Records Manager, Dr. Hunter is the Editor of the leading peer-reviewed journal in the field, The American Archivist, and his award-winning book is the standard text in the field.

“The Gardiner Foundation’s grant will allow us to preserve Long Island’s history and ensure that the next generation of archival professionals has the skills to preserve history in the digital age,” said Dr. Hunter. “This continues the important work of the Palmer School, which is our region’s leading information school.”

The grant includes significant scholarship support for masters and Ph.D. students at the Palmer School, in addition to opportunities for long-term fieldwork placement that benefit both the historical societies and Palmer School students.

“Due to the overwhelming response and success of this project, we are pleased to be  able to award this new grant to expand our partnership with the Palmer School,” said Kathryn M. Curran, Executive Director of the Robert David Lion Gardiner Foundation. “The Robert David Lion Gardiner Foundation’s mission is to promote our regional history. The artifacts and archives of historical societies are untapped treasure troves for researchers and scholars. It is our hope that this award will make these collections available as vital part of local historic study. The Palmer School is our region’s leading institution to offer the expertise and resources to accomplish this goal.”

The funding will also allow for an annual Gardiner Symposium to begin next year, which will showcase progress and feature historical documents.

Gardiner Foundation Fellowships

Gardiner Foundation Fellowships

A generous two-year grant from the Robert David Lion Gardiner Foundation will enable the Palmer School to digitize historical materials in local historical societies, with an emphasis on Suffolk County. Beginning in Fall 2017, the grant provides fellowships for master’s and doctoral students to assist with the project. The descriptions of the fellowships are below. A separate application form will be available soon. Questions about the project should be directed to Dr. Gregory Hunter (greg.hunter@liu.edu).

Master’s Fellows will enroll in LIS 693, “Gardiner Foundation Internship.”

Master’s Fellows will spend 120 hours in the semester assisting with the grant project. Activities include digitizing historical images, creating metadata for the images, performing quality assurance, and adding the images to a digital archives. Most of the digitization will take place at the local historical societies. Fellows will be expected to travel to the historical societies to conduct project activities. Students will receive a fellowship for 6 credits of tuition (LIS 693 plus another course of the student’s choosing). There will be a maximum of 9 Master’s Fellows per semester.

Here are some great courses to take in the fall to help you prepare!
LIS 657, #3074 Intro. to Preservation; Holmes: SA: Sept 16, 23, 30; Oct. 7; 10-4; Post
LIS 714, #2186 Archives and Manuscripts; Hunter: TU 4:30-6:20; NYU Bobst Rm. 745